Written by
Changeboard Team

Published
28 Jul 2014

Top interview tips

28 Jul 2014 • by Changeboard Team

Use your time effectively

Listen carefully to the questions given in the interview and keep your answers sharp and to the point.

This is much easier if you are have prepared well and anticipated questions and have behavioural examples in mind. You only have 40-60 minutes to make the best impression.

Be yourself

If you have to fake your way through the interview to get the job, you will likely find that the job's not for you.

Don't give answers you think the interviewer wants to hear. Odds are they'll sound fake or rehearsed and even may not fit in with their corporate culture.

Answer honestly according to your personality. Getting the job is not the only important thing. Finding out whether you fit into their culture is as well.

Arrive informed

Make sure you have questions to ask, either about the company, the role itself, or even what inspired the interviewer to join the company.

There’s nothing worse than asking a candidate if they have any questions and to be told no. It comes across as lacking interest/enthusiasm/initiative etc.

I recently conducted interviews for an apprentice; the successful candidate had researched the company, noted I had joined only a few weeks before and wanted to know what made me join, the first time I have been asked that, which really made them stand out.

Understand how your abilities relate to the position. If it's a behaviour-based interview, be sure to have all sorts of examples of things you have done - show your depth and breadth - but not only that - be sure to have results for things you have done that show how you were successful.

Everybody has job descriptions - not everybody has positive results. Past positive results are indicators of future successes. And don't speak badly of your current employers - nobody wants a whiner.

Understand how your abilities relate to the position. If it's a behaviour-based interview, be sure to have all sorts of examples of things you have done - show your depth and breadth - but not only that - be sure to have results for things you have done that show how you were successful.

Everybody has job descriptions - not everybody has positive results. Past positive results are indicators of future successes. And don't speak badly of your current employers - nobody wants a whiner.

Top questions for you

Ask yourself these questions:

  • What are my job and career objectives?
  • What value can you bring to the workplace?
  • What links, if any, exist between your competencies and the organisation's objectives?